Looking Back: Dublin Day 6 (Part 1) In Pictures: Sandycove and James Joyce Tower

Saturday, August 20, 2016, was my sixth day in Dublin. I couldn’t wait to get started on my adventure today! We took the DART to Sandycove, about a 15-minute ride or so. From the station, we made our way along the waterfront and walked to the James Joyce Tower. Some history about the tower: James Joyce stayed here for a short time, and it is the location where Chapter 1, Telemachus, in James Joyce’s Ulysses begins. The Tower has so many James Joyce artifacts and displays. If you are a fan of literature, the James Joyce Tower is worth checking out.

If you click on one of the pictures below, it will turn into a gallery which you might find easier to view.

It was amazing to be in the same spot as James Joyce. My footprints walked in his footprints, and also walked in those of Stephen Dedalus and Buck Mulligan. If you would like to learn more about the locations mentioned in today’s post, please visit these links:

James Joyce Tower and Museum Site 1

James Joyce Tower and Museum Site 2

Sandycove Beach

Sandycove and Glasthule

Coming tomorrow: Day 6 Part 2: Dalkey.

*** All photographs that are a part of this gallery were taken by me, Jill Ocone, on August 20, 2016 and are copyrighted. It is illegal to reproduce or to take credit for my intellectual property contained on this post. Thank you for your compliance. 

Looking Back: Dublin Day 5 (Part 3) In Pictures – Howth

As you can tell, I saw A LOT on Day 5, August 19, 2016. After the end of our Celtic Boyne Valley tour, we took the DART over to Howth (pronounced HOTE, like NOTE). I was excited to see Howth because I knew there would be a lot of fishing vessels. I’m a sucker for the trawlers, the draggers, the clam boats…they are one of my favorite things to photograph. I could spend days at the Inlet here at home just taking pictures of the fishing vessels.

We walked the docks, then looked for a place to eat, not thinking that maybe we should have made a reservation. The first four or so restaurants we tried were booked. We ended up eating at the Bloody Stream. I know, the name doesn’t sound very appealing, but it was wonderful. And right next to the DART station! We walked right onto a train that was ready to pull out of the station! It was a longer ride from Howth to Booterstown, but I enjoyed every minute of it. If you click on one of the pictures below, it will turn into a gallery which you might find easier to view.

There’s so much to see and do in Howth, but we only had a few hours to spend there. The next time I return to Dublin I will definitely budget more time to see this fishing village more in depth. So similar to home, yet so different at the same time. If you’d like to learn more about what’s in today’s photographs, here are some links for you:

Hooked on Howth: An Illustrated Guide

Howth is Magic

The Bloody Stream

The Brass Monkey Restaurant – Howth

Coming tomorrow: Day 6 Part 1: The James Joyce Tower!

*** All photographs that are a part of this gallery were taken by me, Jill Ocone, on August 19, 2016 and are copyrighted. It is illegal to reproduce or to take credit for my intellectual property contained on this post. Thank you for your compliance.

 

Looking Back: Dublin Day 5 (Part 2) In Pictures: Celtic Boyne Valley Tour

After visiting the Hill of Tara on August 19, 2016, our day trip took us to four more locations, all with deep history. If you click on one of the pictures below, it will turn into a gallery which you might find easier to view.

As you can see, the day did not disappoint. I would definitely recommend Extreme Ireland’s tour. They offer day trips to a lot of other locations, too. To learn more about each of the locations from today’s post, please click on the links below.

Trim Castle

Loughcrew Megalithic Cairns

Monasterboice

Drogheda

St. Peter’s Church

Saint Oliver

Extreme Ireland Adventures

Coming tomorrow: Day 5 Part 3: Howth

*** All photographs that are a part of this gallery were taken by me, Jill Ocone, on August 19, 2016 and are copyrighted. It is illegal to reproduce or to take credit for my intellectual property contained on this post. Thank you for your compliance.

 

 

Looking Back: Dublin Day 5 (Part 1) in Pictures: The Hill of Tara

Dublin, Day 5: Part 1: August 19, 2016. It rained. And rained. And was windy. And did I mention it rained?

Did the weather damper my excitement about visiting the Hill of Tara? Absolutely not.

One of the most important sites on my pilgrimage to Ireland, visiting the Hill of Tara was profound. I’m glad it was windy and rainy because I was able to disguise my tears. This place was very special to me (if you know me, you know why. If not, you’ll find out someday…)

The Hill of Tara is an archaeological complex associated with kingship and sacral kingship rituals. From the Hill of Tara website:

The Hill of Tara is A ROYAL PLACE: In prehistory and historic times 142 Kings are said to have reigned in the name of Tara. The coronation stone called The Lia Fail or Stone of Destiny has rested here down the ages. And it was here that the most powerful of Irish Kings held their great inaugural feasts and were approved by Earth Mother Goddesss Maeve.

The Hill of Tara is A SACRED PLACE: In ancient Irish religion and mythology, Tara was revered as a dwelling of the gods and an entrance place to the otherworld of eternal joy and plenty where no mortal ever grew old. In the legends of St Patrick’s mission to Ireland he is said to have first come to Tara to confront the ancient religion in its most powerful sight.

The Hill of Tara is A CELTIC PLACE: Tara is one of the largest complexes of Celtic monuments in all of Europe. In reading its landscape we are transported back in time to when the first settlers came here 6000 years ago. They and the Celts who followed them chose Tara as a very special site.

Royal, Sacred, Celtic. Words I would also use to describe a special spirit. If you click on one of the pictures below, it will turn into a gallery which you might find easier to view.

What an amazing place.

To learn more about the Hill of Tara, click here. (Sidebar: To those who know the backstory with the Triskelion symbol, take a look at the symbol used on the Hill of Tara website all over! So awesome!)

Once again, THANK YOU to my spirit guide, my treasured friend.

Coming tomorrow: Day 5, Part 2: Celtic Boyne Valley Tour

*** All photographs that are a part of this gallery were taken by me, Jill Ocone, on August 19, 2016 and are copyrighted. It is illegal to reproduce or to take credit for my intellectual property contained on this post. Thank you for your compliance.

Looking Back: Dublin Day 4 in Pictures – Dun Laoghaire

Day 4, August 18, 2016: My day in Dun Laoghaire (pronounced dun leery). On my 2014 trip, we stayed at the Royal Marine Hotel in Dun Laoghaire, and I would have stayed here again had the universe not had other plans. I was very excited about seeing Dun Laoghaire again. I loved it in 2014, and looked forward to returning, walking the pier, and just “be”ing. I have to say that it is one of my favorite places on Earth. No idea why, it just is.

Dun Laoghaire had a role in WWI history. Known then as Kingston, the RMS Leinster, which was its mailboat, was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine in October 1918 four nautical miles into the Dublin Bay. Over 500 people died in the attack.

Dun Laoghaire was only four DART stops away from our hotel, which was a ten-minute ride at most. Our first stop was the east pier. There were a lot of single people who seemed to be enjoying their lunch break outside at the pier area, as well as a lot of families spending the beautiful day outside. I was able to see the James Joyce Tower in the distance (which I visited later in the week; stay tuned for the post from Day 6).

After enjoying an ice cream cone from Teddy’s on the pier, we visited the National Maritime Museum of Ireland, went to my favorite store, Eason, and had dinner at O’Neill’s Dun Laoghaire. If you click on one of the pictures below, it will turn into a gallery which you might find easier to view.

 

If you ever visit Dublin, be sure to check out this wonderful area, as well as the other towns up and down the Dublin Bay. You won’t be sorry. If you are interested in learning more about any of the places I included, here are links for you:

Dun Laoghaire Town

The Forty Foot Pub

O’Neills Dun Laoghaire

National Maritime Museum of Ireland

Eason

Coming tomorrow: Day 5, Part 1: Hill of Tara (Celtic Boyne Valley Tour)

 

*** All photographs that are a part of this gallery were taken by me, Jill Ocone, on August 18, 2016 and are copyrighted. It is illegal to reproduce or to take credit for my intellectual property contained on this post. Thank you for your compliance.

Looking Back: Dublin Day 3 (Part 2) In Pictures

Today’s post features Day 3, continued. On August 17, 2016, after visiting the James Joyce Center, we went to the Dublin Writers Museum, followed by a visit to the famous Temple Bar region. If you click on one of the pictures below, it will turn into a gallery which you might find easier to view.

If you are interested in learning more about the locations referenced in today’s post, please visit these links:

Dublin Writers Museum

The Garden of Remembrance

Dublin City Gallery Hugh Lane

The Clarence Hotel

Bad Bob’s Temple Bar Dublin

The Temple Bar

The Norseman Temple Bar

Ha’Penny Bridge

Coming tomorrow: Day 4

*** All photographs that are a part of this gallery were taken by me, Jill Ocone, on August 17, f2016 and are copyrighted. It is illegal to reproduce or to take credit for my intellectual property contained on this post. Thank you for your compliance.

Looking Back: Dublin Day 3 (Part 1) In Pictures

For the Joycean fan, Day 3 was perhaps one of the two most important days of my mission. Despite the rain, it was a memorable day. Today’s post will feature photographs from the first half of Day 3 (August 17, 2016) along the Talbot Street area to the James Joyce Centre. If you click on one of the pictures below, it will turn into a gallery which you might find easier to view.

If you are interested in learning more about today’s locations, please visit these links:

Talbot Street Memorial

Connolly Station

The Celt Traditional Pub

The Spire of Dublin

The James Joyce Centre 

Coming tomorrow: Day 3, Part 2

*** All photographs that are a part of this gallery were taken by me, Jill Ocone, on August 17, 2016 and are copyrighted. It is illegal to reproduce or to take credit for my intellectual property contained on this post. Thank you for your compliance.